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Children of the Revolution - Communist Childhood in Cold War Britain

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Children of the Revolution is an illuminating record of the experiences of children of Communist Party parents brought up in 1950s Britain.

They grew up in a unique micro-environment dominated by a faith in the world that was semi-religious, based on hope rather than reason.

Through a fascinating set of interviews, Phil Cohen dissects the value system that dominated these families. He explores how being communist made many children feel isolated from their school mates and how they were often made to feel secondary to political activity.

This generation went on to experience the political and cultural excitement of the 1960s, often coming into conflict with parents who were, fundamentally conservative. Many of them now hold influential positions, and in this book they discuss how their childhoods have affected their current attitudes.

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Data sheet

Author Cohen, Phil
ISBN 9780853158417
Publisher Lawrence & Wishart
Year of Publication 1997
Location London
Format Paperback
Pages 189

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Children of the Revolution - Communist Childhood in Cold War Britain

Children of the Revolution - Communist Childhood in Cold War Britain

Children of the Revolution is an illuminating record of the experiences of children of Communist Party parents brought up in 1950s Britain.

They grew up in a unique micro-environment dominated by a faith in the world that was semi-religious, based on hope rather than reason.

Through a fascinating set of interviews, Phil Cohen dissects the value system that dominated these families. He explores how being communist made many children feel isolated from their school mates and how they were often made to feel secondary to political activity.

This generation went on to experience the political and cultural excitement of the 1960s, often coming into conflict with parents who were, fundamentally conservative. Many of them now hold influential positions, and in this book they discuss how their childhoods have affected their current attitudes.